RMABA Rocky Mountain Book and Paper Fair

 
 
 
Featured items that The Book Collector, Inc. plans to bring to RMBPF 2012.
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The Book Collector Inc.
Mike Utt, Rita Utt
2901 6th Ave. Ft Worth TX 76110
817-927-7595
www.bookcollector.com
bkcolltr@flash.net
Exploration, Voyages, Anthropology, Select Literature
Booth Number: 28

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Title:
Voyages, Cook, James (1728-1779) etal, London, W Strahan and T Cadell, 1773-1784.

Description:
9 volumes including atlas. First Voyage: An Account of the Voyages Undertaken by the Order of His Majesty for Making Discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere, and successively performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Cartaret and Captain Cook, in the Dolphin, the Swallow, and the Endeavour. Drawn up from the Journals which were kept by the several Commanders, and from the Papers of Joseph Banks, Esq; by John Hawksworth. 3 Quarto (11 1/2" x 9 1/2") volumes. Volume I: [12]+xxxvi+[4]_[1]-138[139-360 140-359 omitted in numbering]+[1 blank]+[2] [363]-676 pages; 21 copper engraved maps, charts and views with 17 folding, Magellan map laid in not found in first editions. This copy has the directions for placing the cuts (Vol I, signature f, bound between signatures e and B), which according to Holmes, are found in later issues of the first edition. The first edition is preferred for its plates. Volume II: xv+[1]+410 pages with 22 copper engraved plates, maps, charts, scenes, views, fauna, antiquities, costume with 19 folding. Volume III: [6]+[411]-799+[1 blank] pages with 9 copper engraved plates, figures, antiquities, scenes, views, maps, charts and fauna(6 folding). Second Voyage: A Voyage towards the South Pole, and Round the World, performed in His Majesty's Ships the Resolution and Adventure, in the Years 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775 by James Cook and Tobias Furneaux. Two Quarto (12" x 9 1/2") volumes. Volume I: xl+378 pages with frontispiece 9 copper engraved maps (2 folding, 1 two page folding and 2 two pages) and 27 plates (10 two page and 3 two page folding). Volume II: [vi]+[1]-396 pages with 27 copper engraved maps (2 large folding maps/charts, 1 smaller folding, 4 full page maps), 20 prints (9 full page, 8 double page and 3 folding plates), tables (one folding) and language pronunciation. Third voyage: A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean. Undertaken by Command of His Majesty, for making Discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere. To determine the Position and Extent of the West Side of North America; its Distance from Asia; and the Practicability of a Northern Passage to Europe. Performed under the Direction of Captains Cook, Clerk, and Gore, in his Majesty's Ships the Resolution and Discovery, In the Years 1776, 1777, 1778, 1779, and 1780 by by James Cook and James King. 3 Quarto (11 1/2" x 9 1/2") volumes and atlas. Volume I: [10]+xcvi+421 pages with tables, 7 copper engraved maps(4 folding) and one folding view. Plates 117 indicated to bound into folio volume is bound into this volume and plate 355 indicated to be bound into this volume is bound into folio. Map at page 205, should have been bound in at page 5 volume II. Volume II: [10]+548 pages with, 6 copper engraved maps (4 folding) and 4 fold out views. Volume III: [14]+564+[ad] pages with appendices with one folding page, 5 copper engraved maps (3 fold out) and one fold out view. Atlas in folio (22" x 16 1/2"): 2 folding charts (of the world and of the coasts of Northwestern America and Northeastern Asia) and 61 copper engraved plates. Uniformly bound in half leather with red and black labels to spine with gilt lettering. Included is an Article about the third voyage from London Magazine July 1780 pages 307-312 by the pseud of Periplus entitled A Summary Account of the still unfinished Voyage, undertaken by Order of Government, in his Majesty's Ships the Resolution and Discovery. Compiled from all the authentick Papers hitherto extant, and illustrated by a new accurate, and extensive Chart of the said Voyage, pointing out the Discoveries made in the Course of it. (Beddie: 1780). (Howes C729a; Sabin 16250) First editions.

Complete set in first edition of the seminal voyages of the greatest of all explorers of the Pacific Ocean, culminating in his final, fruitless search for a Northwest Passage, the discover of the Sandwich Islands, and his death at the hands of the natives of those same islands. The first voyage details his voyage to Tahiti to observe the transit of Venus, and his masterful charting of New Zealand, the east coast of Australia, etc. Presented to the world are some of the earliest descriptions and illustrations of the wonders of the Pacific, including Tahiti, the Society Islands, New Zealand, the east coast of Australia and more. Written by John Hawkesworth from Cook's notes, but in the first person, i.e the person of Cook. Cook was not happy with the treatment, and following the second voyage insisted on editing his own account of the expedition. The second voyage, his search for the great Antarctic continent, was written by himself, although he left on his third voyage before the book was printed so that he was never able to see the finished product. Superbly illustrated with, in Cook's words, "about sixty copper plates, which, I am of opinion, will exceed every thing that has been done in a work of this kind." Cook's third and final voyage relates the expedition in which the Sandwich Islands [now Hawaiian Islands] were discovered. Cook would be killed by the initially friendly natives of Hawaii. Also, in Cook's search for the Northwest Passage, he surveyed the straits between Asia and America and ascertained the proximity between them, and there is much information on the northwest coast of North America, Alaska, Kamchatka, and other northern climes. The first two volumes were the work of Cook himself, the third was completed by Captain James King. The publication of this official account was much delayed, and, according to Holmes, "it was so eagerly awaited by the public that it was sold out on the third day after publication". Forbes declares the work to be "arguably the single most important book on the Hawaiian Islands" which "documents all aspects of Hawaiian culture at the point of discovery by Europeans. It is a magnificent summation of all the public and private journals, logs, drawings, and other observations made during the course of the voyage and is as important a record of the exploration of the North Pacific as Cook's first two voyages had been for the South Pacific." He further notes that twelve of the plates in the atlas relate to Hawaii, as do two of the charts in the text volumes.

Condition:
Attractively bound in modern half leather with new ends papers. Some occasional offset of plates to text. Atlas with a damp stain to for edge margin, large folding map reinforce at folds else a better than very good set. $90,000.00

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Title:
Megiser, Hieronymous (c1553-1618) Septentrio novantiquus, oder Die newe nort welt. Das ist: Greundliche vnd warhaffte beschreibung aller der mitterneachtigen vnd nortwerts gelegenen landen vnd insulen, so ... von et-lichen bereulmten ... adelspersonen, schiffern, befelchshabern ...  Leipzig, Nicol Nerlichs Erben and Johann Herman for Henning Gross des Jungern, 1613.

Description:
vi+[15 contents'+[1]-473+[ 26 index]+[7] pages with title printed in red and black, 10 folding maps and plates by Andreas Bretschneider and Christoph Vogel (of 12) and the extremely rare final six leaves after the Register are present, which is frequently the case; these leaves contain tributary verses to Megiser by leading scholars of his time and the final colophon leaf. Duodecimo (6 1/4" x 4 1/2") bound in vellum with hand written title to spine and old spine stamp. (Sabin 47383) First edition

Bound with Martini Crusii's (1526-1607) Aethiopicae Heliodori Historiae Epitome. cum observationibus eiusdem ... Eiusdem de parentibus narratio. Cum indice copioso. published Francofvrti : Excudebat Ioannes Wechelus, impensis Bernardi Iobini, 1584. 388+[7 index]; and Martini Crusii's de parentum suorum periculis narratio (1584) 67 pages.

An extremely rare and interesting collection of voyages chiefly to the northern parts of America and the western hemisphere "never before translated into German." Included are Blefken's work on Iceland and Greenland; the voyages of the brothers Zeno to the north; the story of Roberval's niece marooned on the Isle of Demons off Newfoundland (1541) with map; and various accounts of Greenland, Muscovy, Siberia, etc, including Massa on the Samoyedes. Also Hudson's voyage to the North West Passage which had first been published in Dutch the preceding year. Of particular interest is the appended account of Quiros' recent discovery of "Terra Magellanica" of Australia, which is either the second or third appearance of Quiros' report in print, the Spanish having been published in 1610. the chapters "Kurtze Beschreibung des Lands Virginia welches heutigs Tags der Engelander Colonia ist," on pages 342-356 are of particular importance. The information seems to be largely based on Hariot, which Megiser probably derived from Dresser's German version published at Leipzig in 1608. This was accompanied by an engraved plate of three Virginia natives, based on De Bry which is lacking.

Condition:
Some staining to page edges occasional foxing, some damage to title with professional repairs, lacks two plates, vellum lightly soiled, old institution stamp to tile of Aethiopicae Heliodori Historiae Epitome else a very good copy of an extremely rare work on Americana. $7500.00

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Title:
Twain, Mark [PSUED Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910) The Adventures of Tom Sawyer New York, Charles L Webster & Co, 1876.

Description:
[i-ix]+17-[275 (verso blank)]; 4 pages published advertisements; 2 separate blanks. Octavo (8 3/4" x 7"). Issued in blue cloth with gilt verso lettering on spine with black decoration on spine and cover with gilt lettering and decoration to cover. following issue points half title with frontispiece on verso; "1876" on title with "1875" on verso; second page of Contents paginated "xii," third page "xiii;" second page of Illustrations correctly paginated "xvi;" publishers ads "Revised December 1st, 1876" followed by blank and end paper. 2d state of the 1st American edition.

Not counting The Gilded Age, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was Mark Twain's first novel. By the time he died, it had become an American classic, and it remains perhaps the best-loved of all his books among general readers. When it first came out in 1876, however, it was comparatively a failure. Despite Twain's determination "that Tom shall outsell any previous book of mine," the American Publishing Co. sold less than 24,000 copies in the book's first year (compared, for example, to 70,000 for Innocents Abroad in a comparable period). As an imaginative act, Tom Sawyer led directly on to the greatness of Huckleberry Finn and Twain's other fictions of childhood or the Mississippi valley. As a commercial disaster, it pushed Twain in the direction that would lead him to create his own publishing company.

Condition:
Spine rebacked, lightly soiled with some internal fingering. A very good copy of a scare item. $10,000.00

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Acosta, José de (1539-1600) De Natura Novi Orbis Libri duo, et de Promulgatione Evangelii, apud Barbaros, sive de Procuranda Indorum salute Libri sex Salamanca, Guillemun Foquel, 1589.

Description:
[i-xx] [title, Dedication to Philip II, "Tassa" signed Christoual de Leon, "Erratas"]+1-640 pages [title to de Procuranda Indorum... dated 1588, Colophon dated 1588] Duodecimo (6 1/4" x 4 1/4") issued in contemporary full limp vellum with leather ties still intact. (Sabin 118) A reissue of the 1588 edition.

José de Acosta (September/October 1539– February 15, 1600), was a Spanish 16th-century Jesuit missionary and naturalist in Latin America. Born at Medina del Campo in Spain, he became a novice in the Society of Jesus at the age of thirteen at the place of his birth. Four of his brothers successively joined the same order. Before leaving Spain, he was lecturer in theology at Ocana, and in April 1569, was sent to Lima, Peru, where the Jesuits had been established in the proceeding year. At Lima, Acosta again occupied the chair of theology; his fame as an orator had preceded him. In 1571 he went to Cuzco as a visitor of the college of the Jesuits then recently founded. Returning to Lima three years later, to again fill the chair of theology, he was elected provincial in 1576. He founded a number of colleges, among them those of Arequipa, Potosí, Chuquisaca, Panama and La Paz, but met with considerable opposition from the viceroy, Francisco de Toledo, Count of Oropesa. His official duties obliged him to investigate personally a very extensive range of territory, so that he acquired a practical knowledge of the vast province, and of its aboriginal inhabitants. At the provincial council of 1582, at Lima, Acosta played a very important part. Called to Spain by the King in 1585, he was detained in Mexico, where he dedicated himself to studies of the country and people; returning to Europe, he filled the chair of theology at the Roman college in 1594, as well as other important positions. At the time of his death, he was rector of the college at Salamanca. Aside from his publication of the proceedings of the provincial councils of 1567 and 1583, and several works of exclusively theological import, Acosta is best known as the writer of De Natura Novi Orbis, De promulgatione Evangelii apud Barbaros, sive De Procuranda Indorum salute and above all, the Historia natural y moral de las Indias. The first two appeared at Salamanca in 1588, the last at Seville in 1590, and was soon after its publication translated into various languages. It is chiefly the Historia natural y moral that has established the reputation of Acosta. In a form more concise than that employed by his predecessors, Francisco Lopez de Gómara and Oviedo, he treated the natural and philosophic history of the New World from a broader point of view. In it, more than a century before Europeans learned of the Bering Strait, Acosta hypothesized that Latin America's indigenous peoples had migrated from Asia to Latin America. He also divided them into three barbarian categories. The Historia also described Inca and Aztec customs and history, as well as other information such as farming practices.

Condition:
iii - xvi, 639-640 pages skillfully repaired affecting some text, repaired worm hole affecting text throughout, endpapers renewed, Provenance: near contemporary annotation on page iii. Contemporary inscribed title to spine faded, some edge wear else a good to very good copy.  $8000.00


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